Tag Archives: presentation skills

Confidence Tricks – Presenter / Presentation Skills

product_thumbnailIt’s here! Everything you need to know about confident presentation and public speaking skills in one reasonably priced book. See table of contents at the bottom of this page!

For over thirty years, Alan Mars has coached individuals and groups of delegates from leading public and private businesses and organisations. He has also taught Alexander Technique and voice-work in leading performing arts schools. Alan has taken the best techniques from the world of the performing arts, Alexander Technique and NLP, and set them out in this book, with practical exercises, case studies and insights.

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Confidence Tricks – Presenter

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

– CHAPTER ONE –
WHAT IF I WERE A BETTER PRESENTER?
WHAT WOULD MAKE ME BETTER?
2500 Years of Theatre
Anchoring
THE WISDOM OF INSECURITY
TOOLS FOR YOUR JOURNEY
GETTING STARTED
Terminology
Working with the exercises
Materials
A positive attitude

CHAPTER TWO
WHAT DOES BETTER LOOK LIKE?
STYLE
Practical Exercise
The singer and the song
Alive relaxation
Practical Exercise – Observe
VITAL INGREDIENTS FOR THE COMMUNICATION CAKE
OBSERVATION AND FEEDBACK
Visual
Vocal
Verbal
WHO ARE YOUR FAVOURITE PRESENTERS?
Practical Exercise – Your own radio report
Case Study – Maria
Practical Exercise – Mind’s Eye, Mind’s Ears
DELIVERY
Practical Exercise – The Grand Old Duke of York
LISTEN AND LEARN
The Home Ham-let
Case Study – Interview with Robin Prior

CHAPTER THREE
CREATING A COMPELLING GOAL
THROUGH POISE TO PURPOSE
THE VMBR STUDIES
AN INTRODUCTION TO ALIVE RELAXATION
YOUR CENTRE OF GRAVITY
Practical Exercise – Centring
Case Study – Robert
BALANCE AND GROUNDING
Practical Exercise – Footprints in the sand
Case Study – John
PERIPHERAL VISION AND PERSONAL SPACE
Peripheral vision
Practical Exercise – Walking with an expanded visual field
Practical Exercise – Personal space
Practical Exercise – Walk of Shame or Walk of Fame?
Case Study – John Bourke and his All Ireland golf medal
PERCEPTUAL POSITIONS & PERSONAL RELATIONS
PERCEPTUAL TOOLS
The radio reporter revisited
A little black book
Mental rehearsal ingredients
First perceptual position: your own viewpoint
Second perceptual position: the audience’s viewpoint
Third perceptual position: a detached vantage point
DEALING WITH DIFFICULTIES
Come Back Home!
Case Study – Paul Marwaha
STATE YOUR GOALS IN POSITIVE TERMS
Practical Exercise – State your goal

CHAPTER FOUR
HOW COMMITTED ARE YOU?
GO FOR IT!
Planning — Step One – Four
KISS – Keep it Simple and Straightforward
REDUCING FEAR & INCREASING CONFIDENCE
Keep your head
Posture, Impact and Confidence
How to ‘wear your head’ skilfully
How to keep your head
The Weight of your Head
Rocking Stones
Atlas Supports the Occiput
Delicate Levers
The Skull
The Spine
The ‘Through Line’
Practical Exercise – Your Puppet String/Through Line
Keeping it Simple – Centre, centre, centre
EMOTION, BREATHING AND YOUR VOICE
Exercise 1: Observing restriction
THE SIZE OF THE PERCEIVED TASK
Your emotional state
Practical Exercise – Hasten slowly and pleasantly
Chunking
SELF-BELIEF
Internal voices – talking your walk
Practical Exercise – No nagging
PERSON AND JOB — GETTING THE FIT RIGHT
Case Study – Phyllis

CHAPTER FIVE
BETTER THAN WHAT?
USING YOUR SKILLS
Confidence or Assurance?
HUMAN MIRRORS
Practical Exercise – Mirroring
EYE CONTACT
How long should eye contact last?
Eye contact starts at the feet
Sight lines
ENERGY APPROPRIATE TO THE VENUE
GET TO KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE
Your friends and allies in the audience
Case Study – James Lawley
FEEDBACK – ELECTRONIC AND PERSONAL
But I hate the sound of my voice when it’s recorded!

CHAPTER SIX
STRATEGIES AND TECHNIQUES
GENERATING YOUR CONTENT
Right brain: The Creative Generator
Left brain: the Editor/Organiser
Key words
Mind Maps
Index cards
Practical Exercise – Key Words
WILL ANYONE REMEMBER YOU?
STRUCTURING A PRESENTATION
Introductions: purpose, benefit and structure
The End: Summary, Conclusions and Next Steps
Case Study – Cheryl Winter
A Structure for Presentations – The 4MAT System
Bribery – without the corruption
Practical Exercise – BRIBE
QUESTION AND ANSWER STRATEGY
STYLE
Air Sculptures
Case Study – Dave
Going over the top
Practical Exercise – Air Sculptures
MOVING EFFECTIVELY ON STAGE
The stage walk
Practical Exercise – The stage walk
Practical Exercise – Walking backwards
Case Study – The stage walk and adrenaline control
SPATIAL MARKING AND ANCHORING
Timelines
Practical Exercise – Timeline
Spatial marking in business
THE POWER OF COMMUNICATION

CHAPTER SEVEN
PRACTICALITIES
DEVELOPING ‘NOUS’
PRESENTATION STYLES
Formal or informal?
Large or small?
Tell or sell?
Mixing sell and tell
Participative
Coaching and training
Internal or external?
USE OF VISUAL AIDS
Visibility and clarity
Visual aid or handout?
Non-verbal relationship to visual aids
Low-tech longevity – the perennial flipchart
Projectors
Popular programs – go easy
Preparing slides
The T-shirt theory (less is more)
MICROPHONES AND PA SYSTEMS
PREPARING THE ROOM

CHAPTER EIGHT –
FEEDBACK
HOW DID YOU DO?
Case Study – Dr Brent Young
Evolving your own feedback form

CHAPTER NINE
BALANCING WORK WITH THE REST OF YOUR LIFE
Rhythm and the art of management maintenance
Rest and replenishment
Timing critical appointments
Case Study – Robin Prior

CHAPTER TEN
ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE HISTORY & BACKGROUND
What is the Alexander Technique?
The Alexander Story
Into the Looking Glass
The Principles
Direction
Sensory Appreciation
Pausing
Lesson Description
Application Technique

CHAPTER ELEVEN
SEMI-SUPINE POSITION BENEFITS
Preparation
Semi-Supine Position Equipment
Getting Into the Semi Supine Position
Bullet point Alexander directions

CHAPTER TWELVE
THE PRACTISED PAUSE
SILENCE, PAUSING AND PUNCTUATION
Who are you speaking to?
Practice Pausing
Practical exercise – The Sonnet Stepping Stone

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
A WORD ABOUT BREATHING
TAKE A DEEP BREATH?
Compressive forces
Expansive directions and managing the out-breath
The Diaphragm
Practical exercise – Breathing in the semi-supine position
Practical exercise – Breathing in the prone position
Summary

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
WILLING IT AND LOVING IT
CLOUD-WATCHING
The big picture
Planning your life

Resources

ALAN MARS

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Confidence Coaching Tricks 10 – Sonnet XVIII

Confidence Coaching Tricks 10 – Sonnet XVIII

Voice, confidence & presentation coaching with Alan Mars
Voice, confidence & presentation coaching with Alan Mars

Recite this sonnet regularly. There are exactly ten syllables per line. Remember what one of the original functions of a punctuation mark was? To tell us where to breathe… ten syllables and a breath will guide you toward a BBC newsreader pace of delivery. A pace that is very easy for just about everybody to assimilate easily. By regulating speech and breath it will also begin to have a calming effect not just on you but also on your listeners. Translate the sense of the sonnet pace into your everyday speech and into your presentation delivery.


Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

Freeing your voice - The Alexander Technique applied to the speaking and singing voice

Remembering your Words – Confidence Tricks 5

 

Memory and Centering

 

“If only I could remember my words then I would be composed” is a complaint that many of us could identify with.

 

My friend and mentor, Robin Prior, has suggested that the following is a more constructive approach “If only I could be more composed then I would remember my words.

 

Have you had the experience of struggling to convey your thoughts on a subject that you know thoroughly? This could range from a total blanking of your mind to finding that you are simply not articulating your thoughts with the accustomed ease.

 

Adrenaline, the fight/flight hormone, tends to dampen our usual thinking and memory processes. Its job, after all, is to drive us to take physical action. Have you noticed how fast you can move when a speeding car is accelerating toward you? Logical, serial thinking is too slow in this context. It could, literally, be the death of you.

 

So the most important factor is to moderate your adrenaline flow and turns fear into a buzz, into a pleasant excitement. How? Please see the previous posts, Confidence Tricks 1 – 4.

 

You do, of course, need to practise what you want to say. It’s important to remember that memory isn’t just psychological – it’s physiological also. So, if you are going to be addressing an audience of 200 it won’t help you if you practice your speech slumped in an easy chair with your feet up in the mantelpiece! At the very least you’ll need to practice your speech whilst standing upright. Preferably standing upright centred, with your weight nicely distributed and a good wide sense of space.

 

It’s nice, but not essential, if you can practice in the actual venue. If you can’t get into the venue you can always visualise, pretend, that you are practising in it.*

 

In summary – you link your words and thoughts with a balanced and centred physiology. You link your words and thoughts with the appropriate presentation environment – either physically or in your imagination.

 

This simple approach can really quieten down your cognitive processes and clear your mind for action. Not only will you be able to articulate your thoughts fluidly you may also find that you are thinking more creatively. You might… surprise yourself… and find that… you know more… than you even suspected… you knew.

 

* I’ll say more about visualisation and mental rehearsal in a future post.

 

alan.mars@yahoo.co.uk

 

http://thetechnique.co.uk/